Rabbit Vet Care

Finding a Rabbit Vet in Johns Creek & Alpharetta area with the expertise and experience to care for your rabbit (a.k.a. Bunny) can be a challenge!  We are proud to offer rabbit enthusiasts the quality care that their pet rabbit deserves!  We are just expanding our facilities to be able to treat and care for even more rabbits.

Dr. Colby has treated rabbits from all over the state of Georgia and is the preferred Rabbit Vet for The Georgia House Rabbit Society, a rabbit rescue, and shelter located in Cobb County. The GHRS entrusts the care of all of their rabbits to Dr. Colby and his staff and together they have saved the lives of many hundreds of needy rabbits.

From simple nail and teeth clipping to delicate surgeries, Dr. Colby has the experience and know-how to handle all your rabbit’s needs.

The Windward Animal Hospital has also introduced a Low-Cost Spay and Neuter Program for rabbits! To read more about this service, visit our page dedicated to our low-cost spay and neuter program.

Dr. Colby and his staff welcome your questions about our rabbit care services. Please give a call to 770-569-7298 with questions or to arrange an appointment.

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See who is in the dressing room at Madison Ave. with my little girl!! 😂😊

Georgia House Rabbit Society
"Sometimes, life is just too hard.." - Beckett
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Thanks for sharing! This is great news!We are so happy to announce that our good friends at Oakhurst Guinea Pig Rescue have obtained their shelter license from the Georgia Department of Agriculture! Yes, this is a picture of buns....which is where our paths have crossed...
One Saturday, a while ago, a gentleman named Thomas walked into our Shelter. He aspired to start a guinea pig rescue in the Atlanta area since the previous one had recently closed down. He saw a need and decided to be the one to fill it.
Happy to meet someone so excited about rescue, we gave him a tour of our Shelter and were extremely proud to introduce him to our special buddy, Howard. Howard happened to be our resident bun Ali's best friend....he also happened to be a...guinea pig. Thomas left that day with hope and a friend and partner in GHRS.
A few days after we met, Thomas and his amazing wife offered to pick up a bun from Dekalb Animal Control for us. Webster may have arrived at our Shelter that day, but he had already found his home. Before they left that day, they committed to adopt him. A few months later, Webster chose a wife.

We are so happy that we found a friend that fateful day who shares our commitment to rescue. Join us in congratulating and supporting the wonderful organization that is Oakhurst Guinea Pig Rescue. www.ogpr.org

(By the way, pictured below are Thomas's bun family members...meet Webster and his lovely lady, Loa.)
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Thanks for sharing! This is great news!

We wanted to talk about a fairly common, yet very serious, health issue that your pet rabbit may face... which is gastrointestinal stasis (Rabbit GI Stasis). It is a potentially deadly condition in which the digestive system slows down or stops completely.

This causes bad bacteria to build up in the intestines and releases gas into the system, causing very painful bloating and further decreasing a rabbit’s motivation to eat or drink. This compounds the problem because the rabbit will become more dehydrated and starved of essential nutrients.

The bacteria can also release toxins into the system which overtax the liver and can cause it to ultimately fail.

CAUSES

The slowdown of the digestive system can be caused by:

- Pain from underlying issues (dental problems like molar spurs, urinary tract infections, gas)
- A high starch, low fiber diet
- Stress (from losing a bonded mate, a change in environment, etc.)
- Molting & hairball buildup
- Lack of exercise

WARNING SIGNS

If your rabbit is demonstrating any of these symptoms of GI stasis, bring him/her to a rabbit-savvy vet (like @WindwardAnimalHospital ) immediately:

- Small and/or malformed fecal pellets
- No fecal pellets
- Loss of appetite
- Lethargy / hunched posture

TREATMENT

When you bring your rabbit to us, we will try to determine the cause of the slowdown. If there is an underlying condition, it is imperative to address it quickly. X-rays are necessary to assess the blockage and the presence of gas. (Please note: X-Rays are not included in the price of an office visit.) If our vet has determined that the best course of treatment is to stimulate motility in the gut, we may administer the following:

- Motility drugs (like cisapride or metoclopramide) which help stimulate movement in the digestive system
- IV fluids which help soften the mass in the intestines
- Pain medication to alleviate discomfort due to gas buildup
- Syringe feeding of Critical Care to ensure the rabbit continues to get essential nutrients
- Antibiotics to combat the overgrowth of harmful bacteria (used with extreme caution because antibiotics can also disrupt the presence of good, essential bacteria in the digestive system)

It is also important to provide plenty of fresh hay and greens for the rabbit should he/she get the urge to eat. Providing particularly fragrant greens, like cilantro, may help entice a rabbit who is not overly eager to eat.

With these treatments, time, and patience, a rabbit suffering from GI stasis can make a full recovery. But it is important to recognize the symptoms early and quickly get him/her to us for treatment.

PREVENTION

There are several measures you can take to help prevent the occurrence of GI stasis. First, ensure your rabbit is getting a proper, hay-based diet. . A hay-based diet is essential not only because it provides the fiber necessary to keep the digestive system moving, it also helps wear down a rabbit’s teeth which paves the way for better dental health. 75% of their diet has to be HAY!

HINT: A great way to assure your rabbit is eating is to offer a treat daily. As an example: Papaya or Unsulfered Pineapple, Probios Cookies, etc. This will enable you to get a jump on treatment before it is a major problem.

We suggest to always keep baby gas relief drops on hand.

Another way to prevent this condition is to bring your rabbit in for regular veterinary checkups. After examining your rabbit, we may be able to detect any underlying health issues that your rabbit has successfully hidden from you, such as infections or dental problems.

Third, evaluate your rabbit’s living space. Rabbits need plenty of room to exercise in a bunny-proofed or supervised area. They do best when they are included in family life, but they are prone to high stress levels when there are major changes to their environment and routine. So do your best to create a happy, healthy environment for your bunny.

#rabbitvetclinic #johnscreekvet #johnscreekrabbit #alpharettarabbit #rabbitclinic #rabbitvet #cummingrabbitclinic

windwardanimalhospital.com

Call us at (770)569-7298
... See MoreSee Less

We wanted to talk about a fairly common, yet very serious, health issue that your pet rabbit may face... which is gastrointestinal stasis (Rabbit GI Stasis). It is a potentially deadly condition in which the digestive system slows down or stops completely.

This causes bad bacteria to build up in the intestines and releases gas into the system, causing very painful bloating and further decreasing a rabbit’s motivation to eat or drink. This compounds the problem because the rabbit will become more dehydrated and starved of essential nutrients.

The bacteria can also release toxins into the system which overtax the liver and can cause it to ultimately fail.

CAUSES

The slowdown of the digestive system can be caused by:

- Pain from underlying issues (dental problems like molar spurs, urinary tract infections, gas)
- A high starch, low fiber diet
- Stress (from losing a bonded mate, a change in environment, etc.)
- Molting & hairball buildup
- Lack of exercise

WARNING SIGNS

If your rabbit is demonstrating any of these symptoms of GI stasis, bring him/her to a rabbit-savvy vet (like @WindwardAnimalHospital ) immediately:

- Small and/or malformed fecal pellets
- No fecal pellets
- Loss of appetite
- Lethargy / hunched posture

TREATMENT

When you bring your rabbit to us, we will try to determine the cause of the slowdown. If there is an underlying condition, it is imperative to address it quickly. X-rays are necessary to assess the blockage and the presence of gas. (Please note: X-Rays are not included in the price of an office visit.) If our vet has determined that the best course of treatment is to stimulate motility in the gut, we may administer the following:

- Motility drugs (like cisapride or metoclopramide) which help stimulate movement in the digestive system
- IV fluids which help soften the mass in the intestines
- Pain medication to alleviate discomfort due to gas buildup
- Syringe feeding of Critical Care to ensure the rabbit continues to get essential nutrients
- Antibiotics to combat the overgrowth of harmful bacteria (used with extreme caution because antibiotics can also disrupt the presence of good, essential bacteria in the digestive system)

It is also important to provide plenty of fresh hay and greens for the rabbit should he/she get the urge to eat. Providing particularly fragrant greens, like cilantro, may help entice a rabbit who is not overly eager to eat.

With these treatments, time, and patience, a rabbit suffering from GI stasis can make a full recovery. But it is important to recognize the symptoms early and quickly get him/her to us for treatment.

PREVENTION

There are several measures you can take to help prevent the occurrence of GI stasis. First, ensure your rabbit is getting a proper, hay-based diet. . A hay-based diet is essential not only because it provides the fiber necessary to keep the digestive system moving, it also helps wear down a rabbit’s teeth which paves the way for better dental health. 75% of their diet has to be HAY!

HINT: A great way to assure your rabbit is eating is to offer a treat daily. As an example: Papaya or Unsulfered Pineapple, Probios Cookies, etc. This will enable you to get a jump on treatment before it is a major problem.

We suggest to always keep baby gas relief drops on hand. 

Another way to prevent this condition is to bring your rabbit in for regular veterinary checkups. After examining your rabbit, we may be able to detect any underlying health issues that your rabbit has successfully hidden from you, such as infections or dental problems.

Third, evaluate your rabbit’s living space. Rabbits need plenty of room to exercise in a bunny-proofed or supervised area. They do best when they are included in family life, but they are prone to high stress levels when there are major changes to their environment and routine. So do your best to create a happy, healthy environment for your bunny.

#rabbitvetclinic #johnscreekvet #johnscreekrabbit #alpharettarabbit #rabbitclinic #rabbitvet #cummingrabbitclinic

http://windwardanimalhospital.com

Call us at (770)569-7298
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